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logo iconARRIVAL: Wednesday, February 3rd
RELEASE: Saturday, February 6th.
SHOW DATES: February 4th & 5th


THE DEADLINE for entering your Mini Zebus at the FLORIDA STATE FAIR is coming up VERY FAST. You must have your entries postmarked or have your online entries completed by December 4, 2015. The procedure for entering your cattle in the shows is the same as last year.

The following information is about State Fair Miniature Zebu entry forms and show rules:

You can download the show rules and entry forms on the Florida State Fair Website at www.floridastatefairag.com.

If you’re not familiar with the fair’s website, the following may help you find the forms and information you need to complete them.  When you open the above website, click on “Rules and Entry Forms” at the top of the page.

  • Click on “GENERAL INFORMATION” (on the left side of the page) - This will take you to a page that has directions to the fairgrounds and also an “Arrival Map” that will show you exactly where you need to take your animal(s) when you arrive at the fairgrounds. 
  • Click on “BEEF SHOW RULES” (on the left side of the page) - This will take you to a page that has the rules and forms for our Mini Zebu Shows.
  • IMPORTANT - Before completing your entries, Click on “Open Beef Cattle Show Information” and familiarize yourself with the state fair rules and regulations.

There are two Miniature Zebu shows, and you will need separate entry forms for each one. The first show is the Open Zebu Show and the second show is the Southeastern Miniature Zebu Classic (FMZA Club Show).  To get class information for completing your entries for each show,

  • Click on “Open Zebu Show” and “Southeastern Miniature Zebu Classic Information”
    There are two ways you can complete your entries. 
  • To enter Online, Click on the picture of the red calf. You will need a credit card to pay for your entries. 
  • To Enter by Mail, Click on “Open Beef Cattle Show Entry Form” and the “Southeastern Miniature Zebu Classic Entry Form”. Print the forms, fill them out, and mail before December 4, 2015.

If your entry is postmarked 12/5/15 - 12/11/15, you pay double the entry fee. If your entry is postmarked 12/12/15 - 01/11/16, you pay double the entry fee plus $200.

This is very simple. Your cattle will need to have an official, individual identification number on an “Official Identification Device” (tag or chip). The official tags are those approved by USDA and tracked by their manufacturers in approved database systems. Official tags have unique numbers and are imprinted with the USDA Official Ear Tag Shield. These tags may be purchased from approved tag manufacturers, or metal tags will be provided at no cost by USDA. The USDA website,
www.aphis.usda.gov/traceability/ provides a listing of approved “official tags”.

Find out more information about Florida cattle identification requirements at
You will need to have the "Official ID" by February 3, 2016 when you bring you cattle to the fair. You do not need them for filling out the fair entry forms.

If you have questions about the identification requirements you can contact the Florida Dept. of Agriculture:
We're looking forward to seeing you at the Florida State Fair in February 2016.

Ed Rick, Show Superintendent & FMZA President
Kathleen Schmidt, FMZA Treasurer


Tendon Issues in New Born Calves

logo iconYou’re a responsible zebu breeder; you’ve read all about cow gestation and calving. You’re sitting a respectful distance from the panting mom; you have “The Book” across your knees, a flashlight, camera, wristwatch, cell phone, towels, and sandwich nearby. The stages of labor don’t follow the neat time schedule described in “The Book”, but still a tiny little perfect calf is born. But when it stands up, there’s something odd about his front legs… (full story by Dottie Love)


Bottelberghe Farms Miniature Zebu Steer Project

For those who have never met Josh Bottelberghe and his family, you are missing a real treat.  Not only is he as sharp as a tack, but his family is a true gem!  Over the last couple of years the Bottelbergh's have quickly become one of the true visionaries in the Zebu world bringing his background, ideas and thought processes to the forefront of our industry. 

I had an opportunity to talk with Josh over the phone for more than 1 hour last night discussing his project.  I was absolutely amazed at the thought process and forward thinking ideas he has in promoting Zebu, in unleashing their potential and frankly lifting the breed to the next level. 

His research paper titled "Bottelberghe Farms Miniature Zebu Steer Project" is a MUST READ!  It's a must print...and certainly a "MUST reference" at every opportunity.   

From the words of Josh...

"As average homestead and farm sizes decrease annually and genetically engineered food increases there becomes a greater demand for homegrown beef. It takes a toll on a limited amount of pasture to raise a full sized commercial beef steer to over 1000lbs and 2 years of age. On average an animal will consume roughly 2.5% of its body weight a day in dry matter. For a 1000lb steer that is 25 pounds of dry matter not including the moisture the grass contains. Most of this intake will go towards sustaining that animal and anything extra will go toward growth and conditioning. A miniature zebu steer weighing 400lbs will consume 10 lbs. of dry matter a day....."

The full paper...(click here)


logo iconManaging a Herd During a Drought

Parts of many countries are currently under drought including Canada, China, Mexico, United Kingdom, the United States and others. These continued droughts make it tough for cow/calf producers to survive financially; however there are management techniques that might help. The most important practice in drought management is to avoid overgrazing pastures to the extent that their recovery is prolonged when it does rain again.

"Managing Cattle In a Drought"



I know you have been hearing about this for along time, but we are really nearly there.  Unfortunately it has taken longer to get there that what anyone really wanted, but I think the final product will benefit both the general membership and the AMZA volunteers.

The main stay of the new system will allow the member to "manage" much of their own information and conduct general business, that in the past, required a volunteer's input. 

In general, each member will have a "My Member Page".  This page will allow them to update their information,  renew/upgrade their members, register animals*, view their animals, print duplicate certificates, transfer animals.  AS you can see, we are really excited.  In addition to these function, we are also finishing up at "Show Module" which will include the ability to "enter" a AMZA show and pay the fees online, and a "For Sale" module what will allow members to post ad online for a given period of time..


logo iconHot Topics...

Feeding Cows Through the Winter

From time to time, AMZA will post or repost news articles or resources we think will be helpful to our general membership.  With winter coming up and many parts of the country still in drought conditions, feeding your herd through the winter will be challenging at best. 

Here is a great article from Dr. Glenn Selk, Oklahoma State University Emeritus Extension Animal Scientist.  This put the topic of Body Scoring and winter herd management together.

"Sorting Cows for More Efficient Winter Supplemental Feeding"


patchAMZA Launches New Website

Over the next several months, members will see a many new and exciting features.  We want members to use this website as their central point of contact for other AMZA member, a source of information and a way to manage your herd. 

Over the next several months, you should see a dramatic change in the overall feel, design and functionality of the site. In the several weeks I will be posting instructions for each member.  YOU ARE MY TEST SUBJECT! 

In the first phase, we will build a "My Membership Module".  This module will allow each member to self-manage their account(s).  Each member will be able to login, change and update personal information such as address and contact information.  In addition, each member will be pay (or renew) their membership dues by either credit card or a traditional check/money order. This is all in preparation to building a "My Herd Module" and ultimately a "My Show Module".  Our hope is that we will be able to use the site as a "herd management tool" and a general resource for information about herd management, pasture management and other critical topics association with a quality breeding/herd program.

Keep checking back!


ribbonCongratulations To All of the Permanent Grand Champions

It's been a long time coming....but the 2010 Show Results ARE CERTIFIED. Jim Mannos, AMAZ's registrar, has released the list of new Permanent and Master Grand Champions.  Please join us and congratulating the owners and breeders of this year's new inductees.  

Click here to see complete listing.


mesuring tapeSo...How Are They Measured

Miniature Zebu's are measured across their hip, at the highest point. The idea being that a 38 inch tall Miniature Zebu should be able to barely clear a 38 inch bar.  Measuring at the hip has proven to be more accurate than the shoulder or wither measurements.

See Frame Scoring Table...


Bovine Bloat - Zebu 101

Bloat is an emergency condition that can develop within a few hours and can kill without quick treatment. When we humans feel bloated from a large meal, the digestive process soon relieves the discomfort. Same thing with cattle—most of the time. But when things go awry, your zebu can die in agony while you watch helplessly.
However, there are some simple treatments that will successfully treat bloat quickly in almost all cases. Anybody can do them using household-type supplies and equipment. Keep these items in your Buckaroo Box at all times (a fatal case of Bloat resulted in the creation of the Buckaroo Box—read about it in Zebu A to Z soon).  - Read More

Digestion: A Quick Description

Cattle, being wary of predators, grab grass with their tongues and use their incisors to tear it from the ground. They don't need bottom incisors, so they don't have any. They quickly gulp down the grass in the open pasture, allowing them to run back to safety. Later they burp back up wads of the grass and chew it thoroughly, starting the breakdown process.

You've heard of their four stomachs? Well, actually, these are organs that help digest intake in different ways. - Read More
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